Apple looking more like Amazon

Is Apple striving to look more like Amazon?

Apple, the most valuable tech company in the world, held its quarterly announcement event on Tuesday. As has been well covered, the announcements included a new line of Apple watches, new generation of software for iPhone and iPad, new iPad lines, a fitness subscription service, and the Apple One bundle which includes Apple Music, Apple TV+, Apple Arcade, iCloud storage, Apple News+, and Apple Fitness+. Absent from the announcements were the next iPhone and HomePod. CNBC

dis-rup-shun: Remember when Apple announcement events were all about shiny objects? Apple now wants to be your trusted music, news and fitness provider — asking even more of its loyal followers. The shiny objects that Apple is the best in the world at building, are now becoming merely the remote controls to access the content at the center of people’s lives, like Kindles and FireTVs. The recent announcements also seem to indicate that Apple doesn’t want Disney to get too fond of using the “+” sign, as Apple has emulated the extremely successfully Disney+ streaming service and borrowed the naming format for its premium tier TV, news and fitness offerings.

Not too happy with Apple: Spotify

Spotify, not in the Apple fan club, used Tuesday’s announcements of the Apple One bundle to repeat its call to governments around the world to recognize Apple as hindering competition. Spotify, like games publisher Epic, is not happy about giving Apple a cut of purchases made through the Apple App Store. 9to5Mac

dis-rup-shun: Microsoft got its hands slapped after attorneys general from multiple states claimed in 1998 that its bundling practices hindered competition. Netscape Navigator was the defacto standard browser before Microsoft bundled Explorer, and Novell Netware was the standard network software provider before Windows magically connected computers. Spotify is the defacto standard music service in most parts of the world, but it sees a light at the end of the tunnel and it looks like an apple.

Justice Department warns that video games are new hacking target

The Justice Dept issued a warning that the billion-dollar plus video games business is the next target for sophisticated hackers, citing that free-to-play games such as Fortnite brought in revenues of $2.4 billion from in-game purchases in 2018, making popular games a rich target. The Justice Department attributes much of the game-focused hacking activity on a group called Apt 41. CNET

dis-rup-shun: For those trying to find a career path, cyber security and data privacy should provide you with a secure vocation for the rest of your days.

Amazon enters battery recycling business

Amazon is investing in an electric car battery recycling business, called Redwood Materials. The company was founded by a former Tesla executive who helped design the Lithium Ion batteries used in Tesla’s cars. CNBC

dis-rup-shun: Forward thinking and environmentally responsible, Amazon is putting its cash and muscle behind a noble cause and an attractive revenue opportunity that won’t fully come to fruition for another five to ten years.

 

Share your opinion

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.